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How To Naturally Clean Kitchen With Lemon

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Learn how to clean the kitchen naturally with lemon! Here are 4 toxic-free ways to use lemons instead of chemical-filled cleaners:

Instructions:

1) Cutting Board

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Sprinkle salt on a cutting board and scrub with a lemon half (cut side down) while squeezing slightly. Let the lemon salt mixture sit for 5 minutes (or overnight for tough stains), then scrape off and rinse.

2) Refrigerator Air Freshener

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Place lemon halves in refrigerator for a few hours to eliminate odors.

3) Sink Garbage Disposal

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Pour lemon and ice cubes down into the sink. Run garbage disposal until lemon and ice have passed through completely.

4) Microwave

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Add 1/2 cup water into a microwavable bowl. Squeeze one lemon and add halves into bowl. Place in microwave and heat on high for 3 minutes. Let the container sit in the microwave (unopened) for 5 minutes. Remove the container and wipe down the microwave with clean cloth.

 

Have more tips? Share them in the comments below!

Stay tuned for more toxic-free tips and advice on how to clean your home naturally and without harmful chemicals!

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We Can Prevent Most Childhood Cancers

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Written by Gregory Anderson. Mr. Anderson is the founder and CEO of the Cancer Recovery Foundation International Group, a global affiliation of national organizations whose mission is to help all people prevent and survive cancer. Mr. Anderson, a cancer survivor, is widely recognized as one of the world’s leading wellness authorities. He is the author of fourteen books and DVDs, including the international bestseller, Cancer: 50 Essential Things to Do (Penguin/Plume, 4th Ed., 2013).

The vast majority of the 80,000 chemicals in everyday use in the United States, as well as globally, have never been tested for toxicity to humans. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) of 1976 provides the EPA with the authority to require reporting, record-keeping and testing requirements, and restrictions relating to chemical substances and/or mixtures. But, the exclusions from TSCA are numerous including, among others, food, drugs, cosmetics and pesticides. In the very simplest of terms, this means you and I do not know the safety of most of the chemicals in the products we use every day.

In recognition of National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month (September), it is important to underscore the point that several clinical, epidemiological and toxicological studies spanning the past 60 years support the hypothesis that early exposures to environmental carcinogens can cause childhood cancer and that infants and children are uniquely vulnerable.

The National Cancer Institute reports that pesticide exposure is, perhaps, the most dangerous, invasive and cumulative threat to a child’s early development and health. Each year, in the U.S., more than 1 billion pounds of synthetic pesticides – insecticides, herbicides, rodenticides and fungicides – are applied in agriculture, homes, schools, parks, playgrounds and daycare centers.

The National Toxicology Program has found in animal bioassays that a number of widely-used pesticides are carcinogenic. Epidemiologic studies have found consistent modest associations between pesticide exposures in utero and in early childhood and acute lymphocytic leukemia, childhood brain cancer, and childhood non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Rates of childhood leukemia are consistently elevated among children who grow up on farms, among children whose parents used pesticides in the home or garden, and among children of pesticide applicators, according to a multi-University study and as reported in Environmental Health Perspectives (10.1289/0800209).

Early life exposures to harmful substances can affect children says the Future of Children, a collaboration of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University and the Brookings Institution. One example is polybrominated flame retardants (PBDEs) and similar chemicals, which are often added to infant products, according to Environmental Science & Technology. As a result, PBDEs are increasingly being found in human blood, breast milk, and tissues. These chemicals are linked to many neurocognitive problems in children including cancer.

Cancer is now the second leading cause of death among children under age 15 in the U.S., according to the National Cancer Institute. Mortality from childhood cancer is exceeded only by deaths from injury and violence. Leukemia is the most common childhood cancer. Incidence of leukemia in 0-14 year-old U.S. children increased from 3.3 per 100,000 in 1975 to 5.1 per 100,000 in 2005, a 55% increase. Acute lymphocytic leukemia increased in the same years from 2.2 to 4.0 per 100,000, an 81% increase.

Now more than ever, a global sea change is needed in our approach to childhood cancer. Two fundamental problems of the current approach involve far too much emphasis on early detection and treatment of cancer. While important, this direction does not get at the root, often unrecognized, causes. In addition, existing prevention efforts are devoted almost solely to lifestyle factors such as smoking, exercise and diet. Once again, these are critical -- but they are not sufficient.

Many cancers caused by environmental and occupational exposures can be prevented. Primary prevention that halts exposure is the single most effective strategy of reducing cancer incidence and saving lives and billions of dollars.

In 2010, President Obama’s Cancer Panel recommended that the U.S. Congress must prevail to make cancer prevention the top priority. This is a major shift and some contend that it will take a Second War on Cancer in the efforts to stress cancer prevention rather than early detection and cure-at-all-costs.

I call on the Administration and Congress to make the discovery and prevention of the environmental causes of childhood cancer a national priority for our country. I extend the same challenge to all nations who value their children.  Today, hundreds of thousands of children are being inadvertently exposed to hazardous chemicals at a time in their lives when they are uniquely sensitive to the long-term, detrimental effects. We must change the way we approach childhood cancer.  We simply must make prevention the top priority.

Gregory Anderson is the founder and CEO of the Cancer Recovery Foundation International Group, a global affiliation of national organizations whose mission is to help all people prevent and survive cancer. Mr. Anderson, a cancer survivor, is widely recognized as one of the world’s leading wellness authorities. He is the author of fourteen books and DVDs, including the international bestseller, Cancer: 50 Essential Things to Do (Penguin/Plume, 4th Ed., 2013).



CCRF Urges Parents to Shop with Safety in Mind this Holiday Season

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CCRF offers toxic free shopping tips to avoid purchasing unsafe gifts

With the holiday shopping season in full-swing, parents will be scurrying from store to store in search of the perfect toys and gifts for their children. Unfortunately, many are unaware of the potentially carcinogenic materials that could be lurking among Santa’s wish-list. As part of its Toxic Free Kids initiative, the Children’s Cancer Recovery Foundation (CCRF) reminds parents to become familiar with certain toxins, such as lead-based paints and vinyl materials, which have been linked to pediatric cancer.

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), any toys made in – or imported into – the United States after 1995 must comply with its standards. It also warns parents to steer clear of older toys, even hand-me-downs, as they may not meet current safety standards. Parents must take the appropriate precautions to ensure toys are safe for their children.

The Children’s Cancer Recovery Foundation offers the following tips to help parents avoid toxic toys this holiday season:

  • Avoid toys with lead-based paint: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, protecting children from exposure to lead is important to lifelong good health. It is critical to avoid toys containing lead. Read labels and do your research to ensure the toys you purchase are safe.
  • Read the labels on art materials: The standards set forth by the CPSC require all art materials to be labeled “non-toxic.” If a company fails to label its product as toxic free, it is in your best interest to avoid that crayon or marker. Additionally, crayons and paints should have ASTM D-4236 listed on the package, which means that they’ve been evaluated by the American Society for Testing and Materials.
  • Be sure toys are flame retardant/resistant: According to the standards established by the CPSC, all plush and fabric toys must be labeled flame retardant or resistant. Be on the lookout for this when shopping for stuffed animals, dolls, etc.
  • Choose natural materials: When possible, select plastic-free toys made from natural materials. This can include unpainted wood or fabric rather than products containing vinyl.

Remember to read the label and/or box on any toy prior to purchase. If a manufacturer fails to identify certain information, such as lead-free or non-toxic, be sure to place it back on the retailer’s shelf.

From all of us at CCRF, we wish you a toxic free holiday season and a new year filled with joy and good health.

About Children’s Cancer Recovery Foundation (CCRF)

Headquartered in Harrisburg, PA with a division in The Woodlands, TX, the Children’s Cancer Recovery Foundation supports children under 18 and their families facing the hardships of cancer. The foundation performs acts of care and kindness through the following programs: Bear-Able Gifts (largest distributor of gifts to children with cancer in the U.S.); Toxic-Free Kids (educates families on the dangers of environmental toxins); New Era Cancer Research Fund (funds research for less toxic, minimally-invasive pediatric-cancer treatments); International Aid (provides medications and supplies to clinics in developing and impoverished countries); Helping Hands Fund (provides emergency financial assistance to families); and Camp Scholarships (allows children in remission to reconnect with activities they love). With a national pediatric-hospital partner network of 215+ locations, the foundation directly helps more than 15,000 children affected by cancer and their families every year. Please visit www.ChildrensCancerRecovery.org.



CCRF Offers Healthier Thanksgiving Dinner Choices & Handy Grocery Shopping List

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Thanksgiving children

Avoiding processed foods and food additives can help decrease risk of cancer and contribute to a healthier lifestyle

As Thanksgiving approaches, families across the nation will begin preparing for their traditional holiday meal. While a hardy stuffing and cranberry from the can may sound delicious, these Thanksgiving staples often contain artificial ingredients and even potential cancer-causing chemicals. As part of its Toxic Free Kids initiative, Children’s Cancer Recovery Foundation (CCRF) recommends families consider natural, organic choices when shopping for this year’s Thanksgiving dinner.

According to WebMD.com, a variety of cancers, including colorectal, esophageal and liver cancers are linked to highly-processed foods. There are also known carcinogens, such as sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite and refined white flours, lurking in many Thanksgiving favorites such as bacon, stuffing and many canned foods. Natural and organic foods have outstanding health benefits and are a tasty addition to the traditional Thanksgiving dinner.

Children’s Cancer Recovery Foundation offers a handy Thanksgiving meal grocery store list that shoppers can use to make healthier choices. The organization also provides these additional tips:
Thanksgiving-Shopping-List

  • Avoid processed food: Many highly processed foods, such as salad dressing, processed meats and refined white flour, contain known carcinogens. Instead, try healthy alternatives, like homemade salad dressing and whole grain flour.
  • Choose organic foods: Organic vegetables contain fewer pesticides. According to the Environmental Working Group, a nonprofit organization that analyzes the results of government pesticide testing in the U.S., common Thanksgiving foods, such as apples, cucumbers, celery, potatoes and spinach, all contain high levels of pesticides. It is best to purchase the organic versions of these foods, which are widely available in most grocery stores and whole food markets.
  • Avoid products that contain refined white flour and sodium nitrate/nitrite: As previously stated, refined white flour, sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite are harmful compounds that can potentially cause cancer, and are contributors to obesity.
  • Read the label: Ingredient labels are a simple resource to avoid unhealthy foods and toxic additives. Some common ingredients to avoid are shortening (fat that is solid at room temperature), hydrogenated oil, palm oil, high fructose corn syrup, sodium benzoate (a common food preservative) and aspartame (a sugar substitute).

Reading the labels, understanding the ingredients and opting for healthier choices will lead to a happy and healthier Thanksgiving.

About Children’s Cancer Recovery Foundation (CCRF)

Headquartered in Harrisburg, PA with a division in The Woodlands, TX, the Children’s Cancer Recovery Foundation supports children under 18 and their families facing the hardships of cancer. The foundation performs acts of care and kindness through the following programs: Bear-Able Gifts (largest distributor of gifts to children with cancer in the U.S.); Toxic-Free Kids (educates families on the dangers of environmental toxins); New Era Cancer Research Fund (funds research for less toxic, minimally-invasive pediatric-cancer treatments); International Aid (provides medications and supplies to clinics in developing and impoverished countries); Helping Hands Fund (provides emergency financial assistance to families); and Camp Scholarships (allows children in remission to reconnect with activities they love). With a national pediatric-hospital partner network of 215+ locations, the foundation directly helps more than 15,000 children affected by cancer and their families every year. Please visit www.ChildrensCancerRecovery.org.



Are Conventional Crayons Safe?

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AA039609Children’s Cancer Recovery Foundation Shares Tips for Back-to-School

Sometimes children do strange things, and eating crayons is one of them. With the back-to-school season here, many parents may wonder about conventional crayons: Are they safe?

As part of its Toxic Free Kids initiative, the Children’s Cancer Recovery Foundation (CCRF) urges parents to consider both conventional crayons and alternative options. Crayons contain two elements: wax and pigment. Eating a small bit of crayon is generally harmless, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), but can become dangerous in large quantities if the indigestible wax creates an intestinal blockage. Eating crayons can also present a choking hazard.

Most crayons sold in the United States are certified non-toxic for children. In 1994, the federal government issued a recall for crayons made in China that were found to contain lead, and in 2000, two brands of crayons were found to contain what the federal government called "scientifically insignificant" amounts of asbestos. The possible danger in both of these cases is only present if a child eats a large number of crayons.

Currently, the Federal Hazardous Substances Act (FHSA) bans lead as an ingredient for any children's product, including crayons. Crayola, the most largely recognized crayon brand in the United States, certifies all its products as non-toxic. If you still want to play it safe, however, there are plenty of "all natural" options to choose from. These crayons are generally made of beeswax or soy. Here are some places to buy "all natural" crayons:

Safety Tips:

  • If your child has a habit of eating non-edible things, watch them while coloring to ensure that he or she does not choke.
  • If your child eats a significant number of crayons and you are concerned:

- Call a pediatrician and observe your child for a period of time to ensure that he or she has a regular bowel movement, or

- Call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222 for advice

  • If your child is choking, call 911.

Our children's early artistic experiences should be carefree. The best bet to ensure your child has a safe and toxic-free experience is to follow the tips above. Happy coloring!